Monday, June 11, 2012

Maple Spring - News Analysis + Montreal students protest higher fees and F1

"Government largess when it comes to subsidising the big banks amiss and remiss." More demonstrations, more arrests. It is almost four months now since Canadian students took to the streets to protest tuition fee hikes, but now the demonstrators are not just students and demands are not just about education. This edition of news analysis reviews the Canadian cause.
Source

Police in Montreal have used tear gas and pepper spray to disperse protests against planned tuition hikes and the hosting of the Formula One Canadian Grand Prix in MontrealAround 30 protesters have been arrested.
The demonstration started peacefully on Saturday evening with 500 people gathered in the streets banging pots and pans. However, as the crowd reached the area where the Grand Prix viewing stands had been set, police tried to stop protesters.  Tear gas and pepper spray were fired at demonstrators as some of them began to jeer at the authorities. 
The police have arrested dozens of protesters, with different sources reporting numbers detained from 25 to 37.
Earlier in the day, police also arrested three protesters carrying fireworks and cans of spray paint. 
Montreal Police reported that all arrests were targeted and there could be more serious consequences.  
Several police cars were reportedly vandalized as protesters covered vehicles with graffiti and broke windows. 
Quebec province has been seeing more protests over the past weeks as students protest against tuition hikes. They see Sunday's Grand Prix race as an "elitist event." They are trying to attract attention of the media and public in their fight against proposed higher tuition fees for education. 
However, some of those who are coming to the Grand Prix find the demonstrations more disturbing than fascinating.  
“This is not about school anymore. I don’t even call them protests, I call them anarchy,” one of witnesses was quoted by local media. 
Montreal’s visitors also witness a march of near naked protesters on May 8 when thousands of men and women took off their clothes to show their disagreement with both tuition hikes and hosting Formula One Canadian Grand Prix.
Student leaders vowed to target the Grand Prix when talks in Quebec broke down last week after they rejected a government offer to reduce the planned tuition rises. What students wanted was a two-year tuition freeze, but this possibility was completely ruled out.
More than 2,500 students have been arrested since February, when the protests began.
Student protesters block a police car in downtown Montreal June 9, 2012. (AFP Photo/Steeve Duguay)
Student protesters block a police car in downtown Montreal June 9, 2012. (AFP Photo/Steeve Duguay)
Protesting student face off with police during a protest on the street of Montreal′s downtown, June 9, 2012. (AFP Photo/Steeve Duguay)
Protesting student face off with police during a protest on the street of Montreal's downtown, June 9, 2012. (AFP Photo/Steeve Duguay)
Police detain a university student during a protest on the street of Montreal′s downtown, June 9, 2012 (AFP Photo/Steeve Duguay)
Police detain a university student during a protest on the street of Montreal's downtown, June 9, 2012 (AFP Photo/Steeve Duguay)
Video still
Video still
Video still
Video still

1 comment:

  1. Kim Peterson suggested at the end of News Analysis that the Occupiers should recognise that they are part of a socialist movement.

    I disagree.

    Some might think they are but some of us just believe in an actual free markets and freedom rather than the fascism (marriage of big corporations with government) and the resultant police state along with socialist thought police. Some of us will for ever remain decent but independent.

    For some of us socialism and capitalism are both ponzi schemes or evils of some sort. some of us are beginning to realise that there is no conspiracy, we have simply created a monster and socialism is just one of the monstrous options.

    ReplyDelete