Saturday, July 28, 2012

Doug Casey on Crisis Investing, Political Risk, and a Benign Anarchy!

The US economy slowed in the second quarter: GDP rose at 1.5% on an annualized basis according to the Commerce Department. The Wall Street Journal points out that this current economic 'recovery' is the second weakest rebound post World War II. Cue speculation about the Federal Reserve taking more action, or talk of how government GDP numbers aren't reliable anyway.
How does this so-called recovery lag compared to others, and when did things really start going downhill economically in the US. Was it after a peak of good times for America in the late 50s to mid 60s, with the 1959 cadillac a relic of a bygone era? We are not just talking about its iconic tail fins, but of the decent standard of living for Americans that it represents -- one that was NOT built on unsustainable debt supplanting stagnant wages. Or was what sealed America's fate the 1971 closing of the gold window by Richard Nixon? We will talk to Doug Casey, bestselling author and founder and publisher of Casey Research, for his thoughts.
Also, Spain has, for the first time, conceded it may need a full EU IMF bailout, according to Reuters. Meanwhile, Spanish unemployment has hit the highest level since its transition to democracy post-Franco. We will take stock of the Eurozone crisis with the man who literally wrote the book on Crisis Investing, Doug Casey.
Finally, our own Demetri Kofinas will debrief us on Agora Financial's "Innovate or Die" conference, which is wrapping up today in Vancouver. Demetri will hopefully tell us how to avoid death, no pun intended. Source

2 comments:

  1. Superb website you have here but I was curious if you knew of
    any message boards that cover the same topics talked about
    in this article? I'd really love to be a part of group where I can get advice from other knowledgeable people that share the same interest. If you have any recommendations, please let me know. Kudos!
    Also see my web site > My Website

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks,

      May I suggest, the general subject of 'economy' is fluid at this point in time and to follow the source tag on any article here as there are likely to be a congregation at the other end.

      Interesting crowd at MaxKeiser.com also try ZeroHedge.com - Both regularly posted here.

      Best wishes

      Delete